Homage to Mama Angela Ayancho

Oh Mum!

I miss you.

You left us more than a decade ago.

Seven years after, Daddy Boniface Ayancho joined you with your ancestors.

I am now a fully-fledged orphan with no one to cater for.

I am quite sad.

This sinful world which sent you to the world beyond is insensitive to my situation.

I know that death is inevitable but it is not easy for me to withstand.

Oh Almighty God!

Let my Mum, Angela, Rest in Perfect Peace.

I always have you in my dreams.

Now, I can only pray for you.

Say HELLO to DADDY!

Adieu Mum! Adieu Mum! Adieu Mum!

By Julius Suh Ayancho,

Son of the Deceased

Publicités

Migration

Mr. and Mrs. Migration!

You are a couple without biological children.

In spite of your inability to procreate, you have many adopted children.

Many youth of today are attracted by you.

But why?

The conditions of today are responsible for your abundance of children.

Excessive greed and dictatorship are the main causes of migration.

Most governments are not willing to create enabling environments that can keep you home.

Oh Migrants!

Most of you meet your doom.

Some few succeed but they are treated as nonentities.

Oh Migration!

You can be kept at home if governments become responsible and humane.

Oh Almighty God!

Save the youth of today from the canker worm of migration!

By Julius Suh Ayancho

Julius Suh Ayancho: An Atlantic International University Doctoral Graduate

CONGRATULATIONS

CONGRATULATIONS

NAME SCHOOL DEGREE MAJOR
Adolfo Luis Ballesteros Espin Science and Engineering Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Topography and Cartography in Water Resources Management
Ahmad Reshad Faqiri Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Civil Engineering
Alba R. Falero La Santa Social and Human Studies Doctor of Education Education
Alicia Mszyca Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Chemical Engineering
Amanda Gutiérrez Vázquez Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Latin American Studies Latin American Studies
Amanda Gutiérrez Vázquez Social and Human Studies Master of International Relations International Relations
Amparo Quintero Padilla Social and Human Studies Doctor of Psychology Social Psychology
Aníbal Nicolás Pizarro Sánchez Business and Economics Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Finance
António Moraís Da Costa Business and Economics Master of Science Business Administration
Asmane Abdou Social and Human Studies Doctor of Education Educational Administration
Ayii Ayii Zefferino Social and Human Studies Master of Political Science Political Science
Bismark Oduro Jones Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Theology New Testament Studies
Carlos Manuel Chavarría Guzmán Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Project Management
Chibanda Ifwota Evans Business and Economics Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Strategic Management
Chris Baryomunsi Science and Engineering Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Public Health
Christian Roberto López de la Roca Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Information Systems
Cristián Agustín Toro Schröder Social and Human Studies Master of Science Audiology
Daniel Ramada Piendibene Social and Human Studies Doctor of Political Science Political Science
Diana Rosa Rivera Rodríguez Business and Economics Doctor of Business Administration Business Administration
Dinis Vandor Sicala Social and Human Studies Doctor of Linguistics Linguistics
Erich Miguel Aritsy Viera Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Psychology Psychology
Esther M. Coronel Business and Economics Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Business, Education and Personal Development Project Management
Felizardo Armando Sunde Business and Economics Master of Business Administration Customs Administration
Gabriel Keafas Wimmerth Science and Engineering Doctor of Science Reservoir Engineering
Gary T.W. Ng Science and Engineering Doctor of Science Electrical Engineering
Gregorio Diaz Zambrano Social and Human Studies Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Sociology
Hector Hugo Bello Valencia Science and Engineering Bachelor of Architecture Architecture
Heiddy Del Carmen Cruz Rodriguez Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Arts Music
Henrique do Rosario Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Project Management
Henry Cadavid Sandoval Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Psychology Organizational Psychology
Inés María Zapata Reyes Social and Human Studies Master of Psychology Clinical Psychology
Iniobong Philip Charles Business and Economics Bachelor of Science Finance
Ivan Dario Henao Vanegas Science and Engineering Post Doctorate of Science Neural Networks and Thinking Style
Jasmine Thomas Science and Engineering Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Human Genetics
Jennifer Janice Rogers Piedrahita Business and Economics Master of Business Administration Business Administration
Jorge Francisco Manuel Science and Engineering Master of Science Occupational Safety and Health
Jorge Hernán Chiriboga Pareja Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Leadership
José Antonio Torres Montiel Science and Engineering Bachelor of Health Science Respiratory Therapy
José Dagoberto de la Garza Paredes Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Science Nutrition
José David Berrios Borges Social and Human Studies Doctor of Education Educational Leadership
José Dolores Palacios Córdoba Social and Human Studies Master of Legal Studies Constitutional Rights
Jose Doull Sabillon Rodriguez Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Civil Engineering
Juan Manuel Bermúdez de la Cruz Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Science Political Science
Julius Suh Ayancho Social and Human Studies Doctor of Arts English
Kayiwa Roy Parma Science and Engineering Master of Science Renewable Energy
Ken Emmanuel Karyou Marblow, Sr. Social and Human Studies Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Public Health
Kenesha Oskanna Fraser Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Arts English Language
Kenia Mercedes Placencio Social and Human Studies Doctor of Education Higher Education Management
Kenneth Ngosa Chikwanda Social and Human Studies Master of Public Health Public Health
Leopoldo Mauricio Fort Carranza Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Mechanical Engineering
Liliana Alarcon Luna Social and Human Studies Doctor of Public Health Public Health
Lorena Andrea Silva Buitrago Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Nutrition Science
Loyda Carbajal de Fearon Social and Human Studies Post-Doctorate of Education Educational Research
Ludimila Samira de Oliveira Barai Mikulec Social and Human Studies Doctor of Science Global Studies
Marcelino Goyo Ciriaco Figueroa Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Civil Engineering
Marcelo Vásconez E. Social and Human Studies Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Psychology
Margaret Kaniki Siwale Business and Economics Doctor of Business Administration Business Administration
María Cristina Mota Villela Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Psychology Education
María José Fernández Chicampo Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Science Psychopedagogy
María Paulina Bahamonde Poveda Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Arts Education
Mario Antonio Turcios Flores Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Legal Studies Legal Studies
Marlene Rafaela Herrera Armas Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Business Management
Marta Delia Vasquez Alvarado Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Business and Economics
Md. Mahfuz Ashraf Business and Economics Master of Business Administration Project Management
Miguel Ángel Samudio Boniche Social and Human Studies Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Political Science
Miguel Angel Vizcardo Paredes Business and Economics Master of Business Administration Business Administration
Miguel Fernando Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Political Science Political Science
Miriam Morales Alcalá Business and Economics Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Marketing and Advertising
Mita White Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Science Psychology
Mohamed Abdirizak Abdullahi Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Management Business Management
Mohamed Patrick Moiwo Korjie Business and Economics Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Project Management
Myriam Leonor Torres Pérez Social and Human Studies Doctor of Public Health Primary Health Care
Nayda María Acevedo Medrano Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Legal Studies Human Rights
Ninfa Janeth García García Social and Human Studies Doctor of Health Science Alternative Methods
Nube Elizabeth Zhinin Ayala Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Financial Analysis and Management
Olusanjo Eniola Gbenga Abraham Business and Economics Bachelor of Science Construction Project Management
Orfilia Gil Loaiza Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Arts Language and Linguistics
Oscar Alfonso Ordonez Manrique Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Marketing
Oscar Augusto Fiallo Soto Social and Human Studies Doctor of Science Strategic Planning
Paloma Lissette Toledo Godoy Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Nutrition and Dietetics
Peggy Hogan Science and Engineering Master of Science Health Sciences
Rafeek Mohamed Social and Human Studies Doctor of Education Education
Reynaldo Paulino Chevalier Social and Human Studies Master of Social and Human Studies Latin American Literature
Rosa Nelly Veliz Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Marketing
Rui Wilson Pais Chikande Business and Economics Master of Business Administration Banking and Finance
Salvador Augusto Landivar Suarez Business and Economics Bachelor of Business Administration Business Administration
Stella Maris Garcia Social and Human Studies Doctor of Philosophy, PhD Nutrition
Tomé Francisco Camilo Filipe Social and Human Studies Master of Science Public Health
Velasco Guanoluisa Mario Gustavo Science and Engineering Bachelor of Science Commercial Engineering
Veronica Chinwe Aigbonoga Social and Human Studies Bachelor of Arts Communications
Víctor Alberto Gómez Cusnir Social and Human Studies Doctor of Education Education
Victor Hugo Elier Carrasco Urra Science and Engineering Doctor of Science Renewable Energy
Victor Lwizi Tonchi Business and Economics Doctor of Public Administration Administration and Public Services
Zeh Okomen David Nozière Business and Economics Doctor of Management Business Management

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A Cover Letter: Julius Suh Ayancho’s Sample

A cover letter is also called variously, a motivation letter, an application, a letter of intent, and a motivation letter. It is important to note that the name that you give to such a letter is determined by either the job you are seeking or the request of your potencial employer. The following is a sample cover letter for a faculty position.

 

Department of English Language and Literature

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

University of Burundi

P O Box 5142

Bujumbura-Burundi

Email: suhjayanch@yahoo.com / suhayancho.2015@gmail.com

Tel: (00257) 76688526 / (00257) 75778322 (Burundi address)

Website: https://ayanchojs.wordpress.com

February 2nd, 2017

 

The Human Resources Department,

ABC College / University (As an Example)

 

Dear Sir / Madam,

I am writing to apply for the post of a linguistics lecturer as published on your university website. I am a holder of a PhD in English linguistics from the Atlantic International University, Hawaii, Honolulu, USA. Previously, I obtained an MA and a BA in English Modern Letters from the University of Yaoundé 1, Cameroon.

My PhD thesis is entitled, “A Context-Based Approach to the Study of Names: Case of English Major Students of the University of Burundi”. This work has been published in the International Journal of Theses, Projects and Dissertations and can be accessed online at http://researchpublish.com/journal/IJTPD/Issue 2-April-2016 – June 2016/0. This study focuses on an important sociolinguistic aspect, naming. It throws light on the socio-cultural implications of people in the attribution of names to their children. It also illustrates how names can impact on their bearers and those around them. The issue of names is universal and there is nobody on earth without a name. Thus, I can pursue my research in this and related domains in any academic environment.

From the professional perspective, I have taught English and linguistics related courses in the Universities of Yaoundé 1 and the University of Burundi respectively as a teaching assistant and lecturer. I have just ended a six-year cooperation contract between the University of Burundi and the University of Yaoundé 1 as a linguistics lecturer.

During my six-year work and research at the University of Burundi, I supervised seventy-five BA theses of undergraduate students. I wish to mention here that fifteen of these theses were published by the University of Burundi Press. They can be accessed on Google by simply clicking the name, “Julius Suh Ayancho”. I also taught English language and linguistics related courses namely, English Syntax, Advanced Grammar, Sociolinguistics, Writing Skills, English Phonology, English Morphology, African Linguistics, Contrastive Analysis, General Linguistics, Psycholinguistics, Discourse Analysis, and Initiation into Research. I designed the curriculum for the courses that I taught. This was easily done since my doctoral program had a course entitled, “Curriculum Designing”. My duties at the University of Burundi also involved the calculation and compilation as secretary of jury for the end-of-semester and end-of-year results of students. I also did a doctoral course named, “The Philosophy of Education”. This course enhanced my pedagogic skills.

Sir / Madam, with my academic and professional experience, I think that I am qualified and available for the linguistics job vacancy in your university. I promise to ensure that I satisfy the students and authorities of your university if I am given the opportunity. I would also continue my research in your university and initiate as well as guide students in carrying out their research as I have always done. I will be available for an interview of any type at your convenience.

While awaiting a favorable response, I thank you in advance for attention.

Best regards,

Dr. Julius Suh Ayancho

 

 

 

Stylistics Master’s Degree Syllabus: By Julius Suh Ayancho

Université du Burundi

Faculté /Institut de : Lettres et Sciences Humaines (FLSH). L&L Anglaises

 Contenu du cours de : STYLISTICS MASTER’S Programme

Process Parameter Description
Elaboration Theme Introduction to material in available sources such as books, journals and articles with respect to language and style.
General objective Identification of the principles and tools of stylistic analysis

 

Prerequisite Students should be aware of the notions of language and style.
Specific objectives At the end of this course, students should be able to:

1)       define style and stylistics;

2)       identify and explain perspectives on style;

3)       explain stylistics as a multi-dimensional discipline;

4)        discuss various approaches to style;

5)       explain the goals of stylistics;

6)       explain what is involved in a stylistic analysis of a literary text;

7)       describe the methods of each type of stylistics;

8)       explain the lexico-semantic level of language description; and

9)       carry out a lexico-semantic analysis of a text.

General conditions A syllabus is developed by the lecturer and discussed with the students as the course progresses.
Summary of course content The course introduces students to (i) the concept of style and stylistics, (ii) the nature and goals of stylistics, (iii) types of stylistics (iv) levels of linguistic analysis, (v) foregrounding, and (vi) stylistics analysis samples and activities and possible answers.
References Palmer, R. (1993). Write in Style: A Guide to Good English. Spon Press.

Simpson, P. (2004  ). Stylistics: A Resource Book for Students. London: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

Stilman, A. (2010). Grammatically Correct: The Essential Guide to Spelling, Style, Usage, Grammar, and Punctuation.Writers’ Digest Books.

 

Information The competence that the course aims at developing is highlighted by the content of the course as summarized above. Students follow lectures and take down notes.
Activities At the beginning of each lesson students are asked questions based on the previous lesson. This is to ascertain that the previous lesson was well understood. Where there are loopholes, the lecturer makes a recapitulation of the salient points of the previous lesson. During the lesson(s), students follow lectures and take down notes. During the lesson the lecturer asks questions to ensure that students are following up the lesson. Students are also provided the opportunity to ask questions where they do not understand. Students are sent to the library within the course to allow them empower their skills of knowledge acquisition.
Intervention Approach The approach adopted is learner-centred: the timing is split 60% lectures and 40% assignments/students’ activities. These assignments are done in the library where independent study (tutorial) is encouraged.
Productions Written assignments in class as well as take home assignments
Motivation The activities in the above component are aimed at reinforcing each previous lesson/chapter. A series of questions are given at the end of the course to enhance the students’ ability to revise in preparation of their sessions.
Interactions Students study in tutorial groups as well as individually.
Appropriation Evaluation The students are evaluated, based on the attainment of the objectives mentioned above.

 By:

Julius Suh Ayancho,

Department of English Language and Literature,

University of Burundi

Grammatical Analysis Master’s Degree Syllabus: By Julius Suh Ayancho

Université du Burundi

Faculté /Institut de : Lettres et Sciences Humaines (FLSH). L&L Anglaises

 Contenu du cours de GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS :  Master’s Programme

Process Parameter Description
Elaboration Theme Introduction to material in available sources such as books, journals and articles with respect to grammatical structures.
General objective Assessment of the accuracy of a grammatical analysis
Prerequisite A sound mastery of the rules that govern English language use
Specific objectives At the end of the course, students are expected to be able to apply the principles of syntactic analysis to a variety of texts. They should be able to define, describe, and classify different types of usage problems. Furthermore, they are expected to be able to diagnose and edit usage errors appropriately in context. In addition, they should be able to recognize the basics of language variation, including historical, geographical, social, and stylistic variation. Finally, they are expected to be able to assess how such variation affects judgments of acceptability in language use.
General conditions A syllabus is developed by the lecturer and discussed with the students as the course progresses.
Summary of course content The course introduces students to (i) a systematic survey of the following aspects: the sentence, the clause, the phrase, word classes, and linking through coordination and subordination, (ii) usage issues in Modern English Grammar, and (iii) style.
References

 

  

-Cramer, R. L. (1984). Language: Structure and Use. Illinois: Scott, Foresman and Company.

-Crystal, D. (1988). The English Language. London: Penguin.

-Gleason, H. A. Jr. (1965). Linguistics and English Grammar. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

-Halliday, M. A. K. (2004). An Introduction to Functional Grammar. 3rd edn. London: Arnold Publishers.

-Palmer, F. (1972). Grammar. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

-Quirk, R. and Greenbaum, S. (1973). A Universal Grammar of English. Essex: Longman.

-Ullmann, S. (1964). Language and Style. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 

-Yule, G. (2006). The Study of Language. Cambridge: C.U.P.

      

Information The competence that the course aims at developing is highlighted by the content of the course as summarized above. Students follow lectures and take down notes.
Activities At the beginning of each lesson students are asked questions based on the previous lesson. This is to ascertain that the previous lesson was well understood. Where there are loopholes, the lecturer makes a recapitulation of the salient points of the previous lesson. During the lesson(s), students follow lectures and take down notes. During the lesson the lecturer asks questions to ensure that students are following up the lesson. Students are also provided the opportunity to ask questions where they do not understand. Students are sent to the library within the course to allow them empower their skills of knowledge acquisition.
Intervention Approach The approach adopted is learner-centred: the timing is split 60% lectures and 40% assignments/students’ activities. These assignments are done in the library where independent study (tutorial) is encouraged.
Productions Written assignments in class as well as take – home assignments.
Motivation The activities in the above component are aimed at reinforcing each previous lesson/chapter. A series of questions are given at the end of the course to enhance the students’ ability to revise in preparation of their sessions.
Interactions Students study in tutorial groups as well as individually.
Appropriation Evaluation The students are evaluated, based on the attainment of the objectives mentioned above.

By:

Julius Suh Ayancho,

Department of English Language and Literature,

University of Burundi

Contrastive Analysis Master’s Degree Syllabus: By Julius Suh Ayancho

Université du Burundi

Faculté /Institut de : Lettres et Sciences Humaines (FLSH). L&L Anglaises

 Contenu du cours de :CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS for MASTERS

Process Parameter Description
Elaboration Theme Introduction to material in available sources such as books, journals and articles with respect to the evaluation of two or more languages being compared.
General objective Acquisition of knowledge on the fundamental principles for a contrastive analysis
Prerequisite The sound knowledge of at least two languages is a prerequisite to this course.
Specific objectives At the end of the course, students are expected to discuss the significance of contrastive analysis in relation to languages in general. They are expected to be able to discuss the role of contrastive analysis in linguistic studies. Furthermore, they are expected to be able to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of contrastive analysis. In addition, they should be aware of the importance of contrastive analysis in translation. Also, they should be capable of providing linguistic consultancy to translators, interpreters, and teachers. They are expected to be able to carry out a contrastive analysis of two or more languages. Finally, they should be able to teach Contrastive Analysis as a course at the undergraduate level.
General conditions A syllabus is developed by the lecturer and discussed with the students as the course progresses.
Summary of course content The course introduces students to (i) the fundamental principles for a contrastive analysis, (ii) the components of contrastive analysis, (iii) the strengths and weaknesses of contrastive analysis (iv) grammatical meaning in contrastive analysis (v) the examination of translation equivalents, (vi) linguistic distance in the analysis of languages, and (vi) the implication of error analysis in contrastive analysis.
References -Catford, J. C. (1965). A Linguistic Theory of Translation. London: Oxford University Press.

-Crystal, D. (1971). Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

-James, C. (1980). Contrastive Analysis. London: Longman.

Information The competence that the course aims at developing is highlighted by the content of the course as summarized above. Students follow lectures and take down notes.
Activities At the beginning of each lesson students are asked questions based on the previous lesson. This is to ascertain that the previous lesson was well understood. Where there are loopholes, the lecturer makes a recapitulation of the salient points of the previous lesson. During the lesson(s), students follow lectures and take down notes. During the lesson the lecturer asks questions to ensure that students are following up the lesson. Students are also provided the opportunity to ask questions where they do not understand. Students are sent to the library within the course to allow them empower their skills of knowledge acquisition. That is to say, 30 hours are used for lectures and 15 hours are reserved for independent study in the library as well as practice.
Intervention Approach The approach adopted is learner-centred: the timing is split 60% lectures and 40% assignments/students’ activities. These assignments are done in the library where independent study (tutorial) is encouraged.
Productions Written assignments in-class as well as take home assignments.
Motivation The activities in the above component are aimed at reinforcing each previous lesson/chapter. A series of questions are given at the end of the course to enhance the students’ ability to revise in preparation of their sessions.
Interactions Students study in tutorial groups as well as individually.
Appropriation Evaluation The students are evaluated, based on the attainment of the objectives mentioned above.

By:

Julius Suh Ayancho,

Department of English Language and Literature,

University of Burundi

 

 

 

 

 

Comparative Linguistics Master’s Degree Syllabus: By Julius Suh Ayancho

Université du Burundi

Faculté /Institut de : Lettres et Sciences Humaines (FLSH). L&L Anglaises

 Contenu du cours de :COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICSMaster’s Programme

Process Parameter Description
Elaboration Theme This course studies languages phonologically, morphologically, semantically, syntactically, and grammatically for the purpose of finding out their symmetries and asymmetries. Then, it highlights errors resulting from negative transfer between such languages, and suggests suitable methods and techniques for avoiding these errors.
General objective Acquisition of knowledge on the fundamental principles for a comparative analysis
Prerequisite The mastery of at least two languages is a prerequisite to this course.
Specific objectives At the end of the course, students are expected to be able to highlight points of interference between English and French or the languages under study. They should be aware of the structures of more than one language. Furthermore, they are expected to master the symmetries and asymmetries between English and French. In addition, they should be able to translate from English to French and vice versa.
General conditions A syllabus is developed by the lecturer and discussed with the students as the course progresses.
Summary of course content The course introduces students to (i) sound in isolation, (ii) sound in connected utterance, (iii) word formation in English and French, (iv) style in English and French, (v) definiteness and indefiniteness in English and French, (vi) futurity in English and French, (vii) causatives in English and French, (viii) adverbs in English and French, (ix) prepositions in English and French, (x) adjectival and adverbial phrases in English and French, and (xi) infinitive, gerund, and general review.
References -Catford, J. C. (1965). A Linguistic Theory of Translation. London:Oxford University Press.

-Crystal, D. (1971). Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

-James, C. (1980). Contrastive Analysis. London: Longman.

-Kerremans, K ; Temmerman, R.; Boers, F ; and Darquennes, J.(2008). Multilingualism and Applied Comparative Linguistics. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Information The competence that the course aims at developing is highlighted by the content of the course as summarized above. Students follow lectures and take down notes.
Activities At the beginning of each lesson students are asked questions based on the previous lesson. This is to ascertain that the previous lesson was well understood. Where there are loopholes, the lecturer makes a recapitulation of the salient points of the previous lesson. During the lesson(s), students follow lectures and take down notes. During the lesson the lecturer asks questions to ensure that students are following up the lesson. Students are also provided the opportunity to ask questions where they do not understand. Students are sent to the library within the course to allow them empower their skills of knowledge acquisition.
Intervention Approach The approach adopted is learner-centred: the timing is split 60% lectures and 40% assignments/students’ activities. These assignments are done in the library where independent study (tutorial) is encouraged.
Productions Written assignments in-class as well as take home assignments.
Motivation The activities in the above component are aimed at reinforcing each previous lesson/chapter. A series of questions are given at the end of the course to enhance the students’ ability to revise in preparation of their sessions.
Interactions Students study in tutorial groups as well as individually.
Appropriation Evaluation The students are evaluated, based on the attainment of the objectives mentioned above.

By:

Julius Suh Ayancho,

Department of English Language and Literature,

University of Burundi

 

 

 

Advanced Syntax Master’s Degree Syllabus: By Julius Suh Ayancho

Université du Burundi

Faculté /Institut de : Lettres et Sciences Humaines (FLSH). L&L Anglaises

 

Contenu du cours de ADVANCED SYNTAX : Master’s Programme

Process Parameter Description
Elaboration Theme Introduction to material in available sources such as books, journals and articles with respect to constituents of syntactic structures.
General objective Acquisition of knowledge on English syntactic structures
Prerequisite The knowledge of English syntactic structures is a prerequisite to this course.
Specific objectives At the end of the course, students are expected to be able to identify various parts of speech through structural signals. They are expected to be able to discuss the constituents of syntactic structures. Furthermore, they are expected to be able to combine phrases into clauses, and clauses into sentences. In addition, they should be able to recognize various types of utterances in conversation. They should be able to construct correct sentences of all types in English. Finally, they are expected to represent sentences in tree diagrams.
General conditions A syllabus is developed by the lecturer and discussed with the students as the course progresses.
Summary of course content The course introduces students to (i) the history of structural grammar, (ii) lexical and structural meanings, (iii) signals of syntactic structure, (iv) structure of modification, (v) structure of predication, (vi) structure of complementation, (vii) structures of subordination and coordination, (viii) the constituents of syntactic structures, (ix) the phrase, (x) the clause, (xi) the sentence, and (xii) the tree diagram.
References Bloomfield, Leonard. 1933. Language. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Bruce, M. R and Levine, D. P. (2006). A Concise Introduction to  Linguistics.Boston:Peason.

Chomsky, N. (1975). Reflections on Language. New York: Pantheon  Books.

Cramer, R. L. (1984). Language : Structure and Use. Illinois: Scott, Foresman and Company.

De Saussure, Ferdinand. (1915). Cours de Linguistique Generale. Edited by Charles Bally and Albert Sechehaye. Paris: Payot. Trans. by Wade Baskin,(1959). Course in General Linguistics. New York: Philosophical Library.

Yule, G. (2006). The Study of Language. Cambridge: C.U.P.      

Information The competence that the course aims at developing is highlighted by the content of the course as summarized above. Students follow lectures and take down notes.
Activities At the beginning of each lesson students are asked questions based on the previous lesson. This is to ascertain that the previous lesson was well understood. Where there are loopholes, the lecturer makes a recapitulation of the salient points of the previous lesson. During the lesson(s), students follow lectures and take down notes. During the lesson the lecturer asks questions to ensure that students are following up the lesson. Students are also provided the opportunity to ask questions where they do not understand. Students are sent to the library within the course to allow them empower their skills of knowledge acquisition.
Intervention Approach The approach adopted is learner-centred: the timing is split 60% lectures and 40% assignments/students’ activities. These assignments are done in the library where independent study (tutorial) is encouraged.
Productions Written assignments in-class as well as take home assignments.
Motivation The activities in the above component are aimed at reinforcing each previous lesson/chapter. A series of questions are given at the end of the course to enhance the students’ ability to revise in preparation of their sessions.
Interactions Students study in tutorial groups as well as individually.
Appropriation Evaluation The students are evaluated, based on the attainment of the objectives mentioned above.

By:

Julius Suh Ayancho,

Lecturer,

Department of English Language and Literature,

University of Burundi